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IL license lawyerThere are laws governing all sorts of professions, from doctors and nurses to cosmetologists and architects. When it comes to professions such as social work, there are certain things that are explicitly spelled out as being inappropriate and not tolerated in the Illinois Clinical Social Work and Social Work Practice Act. The Act contains information about what is expected from Illinois social workers and what is considered to be unprofessional conduct. If you are accused of unprofessional conduct as a social worker, you could face disciplinary action such as a license suspension or revocation, probation or reprimand.

Examples of Unprofessional Conduct

If you are a person who works in a profession that is regulated by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR), such as social work, there are certain standards of behavior that you must abide by or face the consequences. Here are a few ways you can be subject to disciplinary action as a social worker:

  • Misstatements when providing information to the IDFPR or other state agency or to an insurance company when filing a claim on behalf of a client or patient
  • Being convicted of a felony or misdemeanor in which an essential element of the offense was dishonesty or directly related to social work
  • Fraud or misrepresentation when applying for a social work license
  • Professional incompetence
  • Gross negligence when practicing social work
  • Aiding or assisting another person in violating any rules set forth by the Social Work Act
  • Habitual or excessive use of drugs or alcohol
  • Violating the terms of probation, if your license has been placed on probationary status
  • Abandoning a client without cause
  • Failing to report suspected child abuse or neglect
  • Making or filing false records or reports relating to your practice
  • Being named as a perpetrator in a child abuse or neglect case
  • Physical or mental illness, impairment or disability that could cause you to be unable to practice with reasonable judgment, skill or safety
  • Soliciting services through false or misleading advertising
  • Violating the Health Care Worker Self-Referral Act

Talk With an Illinois Social Work License Defense Attorney Today

If you are facing disciplinary action because you have been accused of violating any of the above terms, you should immediately contact a skilled Illinois social work license defense lawyer. At the Law Offices of Joseph J. Bogdan, LLC, we can help you figure out the best course of action to defend against any charge you may be facing. To schedule a consultation, call our office today at 630-310-1267.

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IL license defense lawyerSocial media is a large part of many people’s daily lives. According to data from Edison Research, a vast majority (around 223 million) of Americans ages 12 and up are using social media. Even professionals such as doctors, nurses, dentists, and psychologists use social media, though things can get a little tricky because of privacy laws. Health care professionals have specific ethics and standards that they must adhere to and the use of social media presents an ethics challenge for some physicians.

All health care professionals are required to adhere to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), which exists to protect the privacy of patients and their health care information. Inappropriate social media usage could result in disciplinary action from the licensing board, which could affect your career. Here are a few ways you can help protect yourself on social media:

  • Be cautious about what you post on social media. One of the biggest violations that could arise out of using social media is posting patient-identifying information for all to see. HIPAA rules require complete confidentiality of patient information, which could easily be broken on social media, even if it is innocent. The best rule of thumb to follow is to just not post any information about your patients at all.
  • Separate your professional and personal accounts. Another important way you can protect yourself is by separating your personal accounts from your professional accounts. This can not only help your practice on the marketing side of things, but it can also help your professional career from being associated with your personal page.
  • Think twice before accepting friend requests from patients. Some health care professionals think that social media is a great tool that can be used for patient communication, while others think that this compromises the provider-patient relationship. It is important to draw a line so that you can avoid unprofessional behavior on social media. When in doubt, proceed with caution.

An Illinois Professional License Defense Attorney Can Help You Mitigate Any Social Media Concerns

For some health care professionals, social media is a powerful and valuable tool that they believe can be used to strengthen the patient-provider relationship. Other professionals think that social media usage can pose too much of a legal liability to be useful. If you are a health care professional who uses social media, you should talk with an Illinois professional license defense lawyer today about how you can protect your career. At the Law Offices of Joseph J. Bogdan, LLC, we can answer any questions that you might have about preventative action. We can also help you form a plan of action if you are facing penalties from social media usage. To set up a consultation, call our office today at 630-310-1267.

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Il license defense lawyerEven the most responsible physicians can become the subject of a medical board investigation. Each state medical board is required to investigate any complaints that they receive, even if the complaint has no merit to it. When you are under investigation for a complaint that was made about you, it can be a nerve-wracking experience. Your professional reputation and medical license could be at stake, depending on the nature of the complaint and outcome of the investigation. If you are dealing with a medical board investigation, proper preparation is key to a successful outcome. Here are a few ways you can prepare for a medical board investigation:

Understand the Investigation Process

Even though the medical board has to review each and every complaint that is made to them, they do have an evaluation process that they use for complaints. If they find that a complaint is unsubstantial, they will not pursue any action against you. If they do think a complaint is worth looking into, however, they will likely send you a letter requesting a medical record review. If this happens, it usually means the medical board has flagged the complaint as a serious one.

Respond to Your Complaint Promptly

Once the medical board determines that a complaint should be served to the physician, they only have so long to respond to the complaint. If you have had a complaint formally served to you, you must respond to the complaint within 20-45 days or you face disciplinary action. The medical board expects physicians to be completely honest and transparent when it comes to complaints that are filed against them.

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IL defense attorneyBecoming a licensed physician takes years upon years of education, internships, residencies, fellowships and more hard work and discipline than you would ever imagine. For anyone, learning is a job that is never done and physicians are no exceptions. The medical field is always changing its guidelines and introducing new technologies to help serve patients better, which requires physicians to stay up to date on new happenings. In Illinois, physicians are required to have a specific amount of continuing education credits when they go to renew their licenses every three years. Not fulfilling those education requirements could jeopardize your ability to renew your medical license and your ability to practice medicine in the state of Illinois.

CME Requirements

According to the Illinois State Medical Society, physicians will be required to complete at least 150 hours of continuing medical education (CME) if they plan to renew their medical license in 2020. The only licensees who are exempt from that rule are those who are renewing their medical licenses for the first time.

Further, Illinois law requires that at least 40 percent (or 60 hours) of CME must be completed in formal CME programs that are permitted to designate an activity as eligible for Category 1 credit. A maximum of 60 percent (or 90 hours) of CME is permitted to be completed in informal CME programs or activities, which can include things such as medical teaching, participation in patient care review activities and the use of self-instructive materials.

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IL license defense lawyerMost people know that a person’s medical records and information are private information that is protected by law. If you are a medical professional, you must be familiar with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), a law that was passed in 1996 to protect the privacy of patients’ health information in the United States. The law gives rules and procedures that you must follow in order to protect your patients’ privacy rights. If you fail to follow HIPAA procedures or rules, you could face expensive fines and your medical license could even be put into jeopardy. Here are a few of the most common ways HIPAA is violated.

Unauthorized Access of Healthcare Records

The HIPAA only gives certain reasons as to why you can access the healthcare records of a patient without gaining their consent. Unless you are accessing records for treatment, payment or healthcare operation, you are doing so illegally. This can result in disciplinary action and a fine to the organization is possible, though uncommon.

Not Performing a Risk Analysis

One of the most common HIPAA violations to result in a financial penalty is given to organizations that fail to perform a risk analysis. These analyses must be performed regularly in order to assess whether or not there are any vulnerabilities to the confidentiality and integrity of patient health records. To prevent this from happening, conducting a regular risk analysis is recommended.

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IL license defense lawyerIllinois takes nonpayment of court-ordered child support very seriously. In an effort to encourage parents to stay compliant with child support orders, Illinois has enacted several “punishments” for non-paying parents. Parents who do not pay child support can face wage garnishment, property liens, and the suspension or revocation of their licenses. A parent who is in child support arrears can lose their driver’s license, hunting or fishing license, occupational license, and even their professional license.

Illinois Can Suspend Your Professional License After a 30-Day Delinquency

You might assume that only egregious nonpayment of child support can result in a license suspension or revocation. However, Illinois law states that even a 30-day delinquency is enough to prompt a professional license suspension. When a delinquent parent receives a notice about past-due child support, he or she has 60 days to pay current and past-due child support. The parent also has a 45-day window to request a hearing to contest the notice. If the parent fails to become current with child support, he or she is considered delinquent and is in danger of losing his or her licenses.

Professional Medical License Suspension or Revocation is Possible

When a person loses his or her fishing license, they simply lose access to legally enjoy their hobby. Losing a professional license, on the other hand, is a completely different situation. Without a valid professional license, you may not be able to legally continue doing your job. Failure to pay child support can result in the suspension or revocation of your:

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IL License Defense LawyerFor many people, the American dream is owning your own business. For some pharmacists, that dream involved starting, owning and growing their own independent pharmacies. According to statistics from the National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA), there were more than 22,000 independent pharmacies operating in the U.S. in 2015. Of those, an estimated 1,000 pharmacies will change ownership each year.

Buying and selling a pharmacy is a different and more complicated process than buying and selling most other businesses. With a pharmacy, you must pay attention to certain things when transferring ownership, such as informing and coordinating with drug suppliers and vendors, ensuring the pharmacy is enrolled as a provider for Medicaid, Medicare, and supplemental plans and various other things. If you are looking to sell your pharmacy, here are a few things you should keep in mind:

  • Have a legitimate exit strategy and timeline in place. Too many times pharmacy owners do not have a plan when it comes to the sale of their pharmacy and things do not turn out for the best. If you are thinking of selling your pharmacy, set a date of when you would like to have the sale completed. Then you will have a rough idea of when certain tasks should be completed by. In general, it can take several months or even years to complete a sale.
  • You should have your finances in order before you start looking for potential buyers. Whoever is interested in buying your pharmacy will want to look at at least the past three or four years of business record, including audited financial statements, profit and loss statements, balance sheets, corporate tax returns, and prescription sales logs. This allows your prospective buyer to determine whether or not the business is a good investment for themselves.
  • Make your pharmacy as attractive as possible to potential buyers. This includes the physical appearance of your pharmacy. Think of home sales; a person selling their home is not going to host an open house until their home looks as good as it possibly can look. Even just a new coat of paint or new flooring can transform a business and make it look more appealing to a buyer.
  • Make sure all your contracts and licenses are up to date. You should be sure that your reimbursement contracts with third-party payers are available and up to date so that potential buyers can review them. This includes any local business license, state pharmacy licenses or building permits.

Contact an Illinois Pharmacy Sale Attorney Today

When it comes to selling a pharmacy, there are many things you should keep in mind before and during the process. There are many considerations to remember during a pharmacy sale, especially that selling your pharmacy is not as simple as signing over ownership to another person. At the Law Offices of Joseph J. Bogdan, LLC, we have been helping clients successfully buy and sell pharmacy businesses for more than 16 years. One of our skilled Illinois pharmacy sale lawyers is a licensed pharmacist and has extensive knowledge of both the medical and legal fields. Call our office today at 630-310-1267 to schedule a consultation.

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b2ap3_thumbnail_DEA.jpgThe role of a pharmacy benefit manager (PBM) is one that is quite important in the health industry. PBM’s serve as the middleman between pharmacies and insurance companies and are necessary for a pharmacy to operate. Every once in a while, your PBM will contact you to inform you of an audit to ensure rules are being followed and business is being conducted as it should be. Being audited by anyone can be a nerve-wracking experience, especially if that audit is conducted by your PBM. A catastrophic PBM audit could leave lasting effects on your business. If you have been notified of an upcoming PBM audit, here are a few tips to help you prepare for your audit:‘

  • Ensure you are there for the audit. When you receive notice of the audit, the exact date and time will also be mentioned. Make sure you are in the pharmacy at that time and that you are free to work with the auditor while they are there.
  • Review the audit rules. Once you have received notification of the audit, you should review the audit section of the PBM’s manual. This section will contain information about the auditor’s procedures that you should be familiar with.
  • Begin to organize your documents. In the audit notice, there should be a date range that the auditor will be focusing on. In some cases, actual prescription numbers will be provided. Be sure to have all records pertaining to the prescriptions filled within those dates and keep them in one place.
  • Conduct a staff meeting. Not only should you be prepared for the audit, but your staff should also be prepared. Hold a meeting to inform your staff members of the date and time of the audit and of your expectations of them during the audit.

Concerned About an Upcoming Audit? Contact a Knowledgeable Illinois PBM Audit Lawyer

When it comes to any audit, especially a PBM audit, preparation is key for a successful outcome. If you have gotten notice of an upcoming PBM audit, you should contact a skilled Illinois PBM audit attorney. The Law Offices of Joseph J. Bogdan, LLC has been helping clients prepare for PBM audits and advising clients of their next steps after PBM audits for more than 16 years. Being both an attorney and a registered pharmacist, Attorney Joseph Bogdan has the legal and medical knowledge needed to help you make the best decisions for your pharmacy. Call our office today at 630-310-1267 to schedule a consultation.

 

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IL license defense attorneyEach year, the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) issues, renews and reinstates hundreds of licenses to those in the dental field. To be eligible for a general Illinois dental license, you must complete years of schooling, have years of clinical training, and pass both a national and regional dentistry test. After putting so much effort into getting your license to practice dentistry, the last thing you would want to do is jeopardize your license by committing a simple violation. Depending on the violation, you could face disciplinary or non-disciplinary action and fines of up to $10,000 per offense.

Common Violations That Could Affect Your License

To practice dentistry in Illinois, you are required to have a valid Illinois dental license. The IDFPR is the licensing entity that determines whether or not you can practice dentistry. There are a number of violations that could cause the IDFPR to refuse, revoke or suspend your license to practice dentistry. These violations include:

  • Misrepresentation on your application for a license or renewal
  • Inability to safely practice because of excessive use of or addiction to alcohol or other drugs
  • Employing or aiding or abetting a person who is not licensed to be a dentist or dental hygienist to practice dentistry or dental hygiene
  • Making false promises or misrepresentations to potential patients in order to get their patronage
  • Performing Medicaid fraud
  • Practicing under a false name
  • Employing more than four dental hygienists under his or her supervision at a time
  • Failing to report a suspected incident of child abuse or neglect
  • Prescribing narcotics for uses other than therapeutic uses
  • Professional incompetence
  • Physical or mental illness that prevents a person from practicing dentistry with reasonable skill, safety, and judgment
  • Immoral conduct
  • Cheating on the licensing exam
  • Failing to maintain patient care and treatment records

Contact an Illinois Dentist License Defense Attorney Today

Being a dentist can be a rewarding career for many, but that can be jeopardized in the blink of an eye. If you commit a serious violation, you could face a revocation or suspension of your dental license or the IDFPR could refuse to renew your license. If you have been accused of violating any of the rules of dentistry, you should contact a skilled Illinois dentist license defense lawyer right away. At the Law Offices of Joseph J. Bogdan, LLC, we can help you take the necessary steps to prepare your defense for any accusation. Call our office today at 630-310-1267 to schedule a consultation.

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IL license defense lawyerThere are many professions in Illinois and across the country that require you to hold a license to practice your trade. The Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) is the governing body that oversees all of the licensing in the state, including the licensing of clinical psychologists and prescribing psychologists. A prescribing psychologist is a licensed clinical psychologist that has been granted permission to prescribe mental health medication in certain circumstances. A clinical psychologist is an individual who holds a doctorate degree, has completed years of supervised experience and an internship to practice in Illinois. A prescribing psychologist has to go through specific schooling and training in order to practice.

The Reason for Prescribing Psychologists

Most people who take medication for mental health issues have gone through the usual process. They see a psychologist on a regular basis for talk therapy, but the psychologist suggests that the addition of medication may help, though they are unable to prescribe it. Most of the time, a person’s primary care physician is who prescribes medication for mental health issues, though they do not have nearly as much training in the specialized field of psychology and mental health disorders. The creation of prescribing psychologists helps to ensure the patient has both the therapy and medication that they need and takes an integrated approach to solving that issue.

Licensing Requirements

To be a prescribing psychologist, you have to meet a certain set of educational and professional requirements. To get a prescribing psychologist license, you must:

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IL license defense lawyerWholesale drug distributors are actually pretty strictly regulated in the United States. To be a wholesale drug distributor, you have to be properly accredited and licensed and you must also pass a series of tests and inspections. The Verified-Accredited Wholesale Distributors (VAWD) was created by the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) and helps ensure the quality of drugs that are in the U.S. marketplace. This is accomplished by requiring distributors to pass a variety of tests and criteria in order to receive the accreditation. Here are a few mistakes you should avoid making if you are trying to receive VAWD accreditation.

Not Properly Preparing

The accreditation process is one that is extremely thorough and often complicated. There are various documents that you must have on hand when you apply for your VAWD accreditation and you even have to have a complete business plan and Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) written out that prove that you will be compliant with all federal and state laws and requirements. Not having proper planning before you even begin the process can spell disaster.

Using Business Policies and Plans That Are Not Unique

One of the major requirements in the VAWD accreditation process is having an SOP and business plan that outlines the company’s practices and that proves that the company can meet each specific set of criteria put forth by the VAWD. The VAWD does not accept SOP’s that are cookie cutter or the same as other wholesale drug distribution companies. Your business plan and SOP has to be unique and tailor to your company, or you risk your application being canceled or straight up denied.

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IL license defense attorneySocial workers are all around us -- they can be found in schools, hospitals, mental health clinics, the military, private corporations and even in private practices. The purpose of social work is to help people and promote overall well being, which is why social workers are licensed and regulated in the state of Illinois by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR). Illinois provides two options for licensure in the state: licensed social worker (LSW) and licensed clinical social worker (LCSW). These licenses are similar, but there are limitations on what each type of license permits a person to do, which is also why the requirements for each license are different.

Licensed Social Worker

If a person holds an LSW, they are permitted to practice social casework, social group work, community-based social welfare, social work education or social work research. LSWs are permitted to administer social services to individuals, groups or communities, along with engaging in clinical social work, as long as it is not conducted in a private, independent practice.

To obtain an LSW, a person is required to:

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IL license defenseBecoming a physician is a long and difficult process. You go to school for nearly 10 years, hold internships, practice medicine as a resident and you might even further your career by specializing in a specific field, which takes even more training. The last thing you would want is for something small and unrelated to put your medical license in jeopardy. In the state of Illinois, physicians are held to a higher standard than is the general population. Physicians are expected to be upstanding citizens, which is why even a small and/or unrelated criminal charge can have a large impact on one’s medical career. If you are convicted of a crime, your license will probably be revoked, but there are things you can do to mitigate the situation.

Crimes and Your Medical License

Prior to 2017, any felony conviction meant an automatic denial for new medical license applicants or revocation for current medical license holders. Under the current law, any person who was convicted of a criminal charge may petition to have his or her license reinstated if five years have passed since the conviction or three years have passed since the individual was released from confinement, whichever is later.

Not all who petition to have their license reinstated will have that petition granted. The Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) will examine a variety of factors when making a determination of whether or not to reinstate a license. These factors include:

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IL license defense lawyerMost occupations in the healthcare field require specialized education and training that can take years and years of hard work. The last thing you would want to see happen is for all that work to be taken away from you because of one mistake. In the state of Illinois, there are certain rules and laws that you must follow when you are a nurse. A violation of these rules could result in disciplinary action, such as probation, suspension or other reprimanding actions. For some offenses, you could have your nursing license revoked, meaning it is permanently taken away from you. This can be devastating for those who have made their career from nursing. Here are a few ways in which your nursing license could be taken away:

Refusal to Participate in a Recovery Program

Part of a nurse’s job is to dispense medication to patients. This means they have almost unlimited access to certain drugs, which can be tempting for nurses who have addiction issues. If it is discovered that a nurse has an addiction issue or abuses alcohol, the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) will often suspend his or her license until they have entered an addiction recovery program. Nurses who refuse to enter a program or who cannot complete the program successfully may lose their nursing license.

Drug Diversion

Drug diversion occurs when a nurse takes medication from the medicine cabinet to use it for an illicit purpose. Some nurses take medication such as opioids to fuel their own addictions, some take the pills for friends or family and some use the pills to make a little extra cash by selling them. Either way, this is a crime and can even result in criminal charges, let alone the loss of a nursing license.

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IL license lawyerThe world of healthcare is constantly changing. For some pharmacies, keeping up with these changes can be difficult, particularly for independent or small pharmacies. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is the governing body that oversees the practices of different medical professionals who provide services covered by Medicare and Medicaid. One of the goals of CMS is to try to cut down on healthcare fraud and they do this by conducting audits to ensure providers operate within the legal standards. CMS audits can sometimes produce less-than-favorable results that could seriously affect the operation of your pharmacy and its financial wellbeing. Here are a few things you and your employees can do to minimize any errors or inadvertent fraudulent practices:

  • Ensure you are meeting requirements for both non-controlled and controlled substances. When filling and dispensing a prescription, there are certain pieces of information that you must collect, plus a few special pieces of information for controlled substances. To fill a prescription, you must have the prescriber’s signature on the prescription, the name, strength and dosage form of the drug, the directions for use and the number of pre-authorized refills (if any). For controlled substances, the prescriber must have the appropriate authority to prescribe such a drug and the prescriber must manually sign the prescription on the date it was issued.
  • Follow proper procedures for prescription dosages that exceed the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines. If you or your employees notice that a drug has been prescribed an unusually high dosage or in a dosage that exceeds the FDA’s recommendations, you should first check the drug’s dosage guidelines on one of the online references. If the dosage does, in fact, exceed FDA guidelines, you should contact the prescriber to verify the dosage amount. Be sure to get a hard copy of all communication regarding dosage and include the patient’s diagnosis and the prescriber’s reason for overriding the dosage guidelines.
  • Ensure your employees properly document when a beneficiary receives his or her prescription. This is one of the rules that exists to ensure the chain of possession is accurate. When you fill a prescription for someone, you must document that they received their prescription. Maintaining an accurate signature log can help you avoid accusations of fraud.

An Illinois Medicare Pharmacy Audit Defense Lawyer Can Help

Before you are subject to a field audit, CMS will notify you of the date, giving you time to prepare and ensure things are in good working order. A CMS audit can be extremely important -- consequences of a negative audit can range from a simple warning or monetary fine to forfeited CMS reimbursements. At the Law Offices of Joseph J. Bogdan, LLC, we can help you prepare for an upcoming CMS audit or we can help you challenge the results of an already completed audit. Get in touch with our knowledgeable Illinois Medicare pharmacy audit defense attorneys today to begin talking about your case. Call our office at 630-310-1267 to schedule a free consultation.

 

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IL license defense lawyerEach year, thousands of licensed professionals receive some sort of disciplinary action against them in Illinois. The Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) is the regulating body for many of Illinois’ professionals, including physicians, nurses, pharmacists, chiropractors and dentists. These professionals are held to a higher standard than other citizens and they each have certain rules they must follow. Breaking those rules could result in disciplinary action, which comes in a variety of forms. If you are a licensed professional and you are facing any of these actions, it is crucial you understand exactly what they mean.

Types of Disciplinary Actions

Once a complaint has been filed against you, the department may or may not launch an investigation into the complaint. The investigation could result in nothing happening, but it could also result in some form of discipline. Here are a few common ways the IDFPR could discipline a licensed professional:

  • Reprimand: Receiving a reprimand does not affect a licensee’s ability to practice, but it does create a public record of discipline for the professional. They may also be required to meet additional requirements or conditions.
  • Probation: Being placed on probation typically means a licensee is permitted to practice, but only under certain terms and conditions. Probation may result in monitoring by the Probation Compliance Unit and can be for a definite or indefinite period of time.
  • Suspension: Similar to probation, a suspension may require a licensee to follow certain terms and conditions, but the licensee is not permitted to continue to practice during the suspension period. Probation typically follows a suspension period.
  • Summary or Temporary Suspension: A summary or temporary suspension may be imposed on a licensee that is thought to pose an imminent danger to the public. The license could stay suspended throughout the hearing of the case.
  • Revocation: No licensee is permitted to practice while his or her license is revoked. Many licensees must wait a minimum of three years to file a Petition for Restoration.
  • Refuse to Renew: If the IDFPR refuses to renew a license, the licensee is prohibited from practicing after the expiration date of the license.
  • Relinquished, Surrendered or Permanent Inactive: These three terms are not necessarily disciplinary actions, though they can be. A license in one of these statuses is not permitted to practice.
  • Fines: Fines can be imposed on licensees as a disciplinary action in itself or in conjunction with one of the above actions.

An Illinois Professional License Defense Attorney Can Help

If you are facing any of the above disciplinary actions, it is crucial to your career that you immediately contact an Illinois professional license defense lawyer. At the Law Offices of Joseph J. Bogdan, LLC, we can help you defend your license against any of the above actions. To schedule a free consultation, call our office today at 630-310-1267.

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IL medical license defense attorneyAccording to the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation, there are around 3,000 complaints filed each year against doctors and other medical professionals. There are many reasons why a physician or medical professional could have a complaint lodged against him or her -- and there are 50 different actions specified in the Illinois Medical Practice Act of 1987 that could result in disciplinary action against a physician. Some of the most common complaints include unprofessional conduct and substandard care, but any complaint is a possible threat to your medical license. It is important to understand the process of a complaint if you have one filed against you.

Initial Claims Are Made

When an initial claim is made to the Board about allegations against a physician or other professional, the complaint process is started. The disciplinary board will provide the complainant with information about the complaint process and information on whether or not the claim has become a complaint and why. The claims are forwarded to the Chief of Medical Investigations to determine whether or not the claim will become a complaint.

Claims Are Examined

Once the Chief receives a claim, they will examine all information and determine if the claim becomes a complaint. If the claim does not become a complaint, the Chief will submit his or her findings on why the claim has not progressed and his or her recommendations for closure. If the claim does become a complaint, the Chief will work with a medical coordinator to determine if the complaint is ready for immediate consideration for prosecution potential.

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IL license defense lawyerHere in the state of Illinois, medical employees are monitored and regulated by the Illinois Medical Board. With over 3,000 complaints made each year against medical personnel, the disciplinary bBoard will usually launch an investigation in order to fully understand the situation. If the board ultimately decides that the complaint was made on valid grounds, disciplinary action could include suspension or revocation of your medical license. While a complaint can be lodged for a number of reasons, one of the most common reasons for a complaint is a consumer complaining of sexual misconduct from a medical professional. Below we will examine the steps you can take to avoid a sexual misconduct claim.

Steps You Can Take

When a sexual misconduct claim is filed against you, the results can threaten your family’s livelihood. According to a study conducted by the Atlanta-Journal Constitution, more than 2,400 doctors have been sanctioned for sexual misconduct nationwide over the past two decades. Here are three simple steps you can take to avoid a complaint or ensure that a false-accusation will not cost you your job:

Have a Witness Present: When a person is going through an exam, it is entirely possible that they could misconstrue professional examination as a form of sexual misconduct. Because of this, it is important for you to request that another medical employee be present for the examination. A patient may also feel more comfortable if a member of their family is present in the room. In the event of a false or misconstrued complaint, the witness can speak on your behalf, and be vital in ensuring that you will not face disciplinary action.

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IL license attorneyHere in the state of Illinois, nursing professionals are monitored and regulated by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR), as well as the Illinois Board of Nursing. Nursing can be an incredibly gratifying career path, but also comes with a wide array of challenges.

Nurses are routinely asked to treat for injured and sick patients, provide emotional support and advice to families, assist doctors in the process of diagnosis, and file paperwork. If mistakes are made throughout these processes, nurses can face investigations from the IDFPR or the Illinois Board of nursing, and potentially lose their nursing license. If you believe that your nursing license may be at risk, seek out legal assistance, immediately.

Costly Nursing Mistakes

When a nursing professional acts negligently, the ramifications can be significant. Whether your actions are strictly negligent mistakes or reckless forms of malpractice, an investigation from the IDFPR can ultimately cost you your livelihood. Listed below, are some of the most commonly investigated forms of nursing error.

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IL license defense lawyerMembers of the medical community are held to an incredibly high standard. Due to the manner in which an error or negligent act can impact a patient, a mistake can cost a medical employee their medical license. Here in the state of Illinois, the Illinois Medical Disciplinary Board is in charge of responding to complaints made against medical personnel. Every year, the Disciplinary Board receives approximately 3,000 complaints. If a complaint is filed against you, it is important to act quickly and seek out legal guidance immediately.

Mistakes That Could Cost You

Medical professionals are under an incredible amount of pressure. Long hours, rigorous work days, and the pressure of life or death operations, are all aspects of life as a medical worker. Due to the stressors of medical work, it is not uncommon for mistakes to occur. Listed below are some of the most common mistakes, that could potentially cost you your medical license.

Medical Error: When patients enter a medical facility, they are putting their complete trust into the hands of the doctors and nurses, alike. While this trust is usually rewarded through quality care, in the vast majority of cases, medical error is entirely possible. Medical mistakes can range from delays in treatment, failure to correctly diagnose a condition, and incorrect prescription writeups. In some cases, errors such as overprescribing a patient, are intended actions. Regardless of the reasons why the mistake occurred, a medical error can cost you your license.

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