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Il license defense lawyerMedical providers that prescribe, dispense, or handle controlled substances are required to follow all applicable laws and regulations related to these drugs. The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) monitors providers to ensure that controlled substances are being used correctly, and it may take action to address any potential violations of the law. As part of its ongoing efforts, the DEA often conducts audits and inspections, and providers who have received a Notice of Inspection from the DEA will want to understand their rights and how they can protect themselves from consequences that could affect their DEA registration or their professional license.

Understanding DEA Inspections

The DEA performs regular, routine audits of medical providers that have a controlled substance registration. Inspections may also be performed as part of a larger investigation related to possible drug diversion, including in cases involving reports or claims of unlawful prescribing, unlawful dispensing, or conspiracy to possess or distribute controlled substances.

While the DEA may obtain a search warrant before performing an inspection, in most cases, a provider will receive a Notice of Inspection. This notice will follow a standard form (DEA Form 82), and it will include the name and address of the premises being inspected, the name and title of the owner or operator in charge of the premises, the date and time when the inspection will be performed, and the signature of the person performing the inspection. Typically, a registrant must provide informed consent before an inspection can be performed, and they have the constitutional right to refuse an inspection. Informed consent is given by signing a written statement in which a provider will verify that they understand that the results of an inspection could be used as evidence if the DEA or other law enforcement officials decide to pursue criminal drug charges.

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IL defense attorneyOpioid abuse and the abuse of other prescription drugs are at an all-time high in the United States. Pill mills are among the major sources of these drugs. As a result, federal and state agencies, as well as licensing boards have started cracking down on the prescribing of pain medications. In fact, facilities that work with the chronically ill are facing intense scrutiny, as are advanced practice registered nurses since they work under prescriptive delegation. This extra attention, though not always warranted, places the licensing status of nurses at risk. Learn more about the investigation process and how to protect your nursing license with help from the following information.

Investigations Can Be More Like Fishing Expeditions

Investigations for matters relating to prescriptive authority or the “excessive” writing of pain prescriptions may be closed if the Illinois Board of Nursing lacks evidence. Alternatively, the investigation could go another way. Something you say could be misinterpreted as evidence in a prescription abuse case, or the investigation could turn into a fishing expedition. The investigator might start looking for any sort of infraction. He or she could even use what seems like an innocent conversation to gather evidence against you for a matter completely unrelated to the initial query. This is why it is so critical that you understand the investigative process, the risk to your nursing license, and how to protect it.

Protecting Your Nursing License

First and foremost, you must understand that the Board of Nursing is not your ally. The Board is not necessarily interested in preserving your practice or offering you leniency. The Illinois Board of Nursing was established to protect the public, but Board representatives can be almost manipulative in their investigations. Moreover, they are unlikely to inform you of your rights—especially your right to consult an attorney before ever speaking with them. In fact, some investigators may even attempt to use their authority or an air of urgency to coerce you into speaking with them before you have had the chance to obtain legal counsel. Do not let them do this to you! Know your rights.

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IL defense lawyerMost Illinois physicians are familiar with the Illinois Medical Board. It is where they obtained licensing status, and it is a constant concern to their practice. However, fewer people—including some doctors— know about the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) and the role it plays in their lives. Learn what it is and why it is important with help from the following information.

The Federation of State Medical Boards

Each state has its own licensing board, and the Federation of State Medical Boards ties them all together. It represents the 70 medical boards in the United States and its territories, including the District of Columbia. It offers policies, education, programs, and additional services to the state boards so that they can function effectively. The FSMB also enables state-to-state sharing of physician information. By far, that sharing is likely the most concerning issue for physicians.

How FSMB Sharing Can Impact Your Practice

The FSMB sharing allows state boards to look up disciplinary actions carried out by other state boards. So, if you lose your medical license or have it suspended in one state and then try to move, you may still be barred from practicing medicine. If you come under investigation, fail to see the investigation through to completion and move, the new state may have access to that information as well. Patients can also use the FSMB to check licensing issues in other states. With this in mind, even if an investigation seems arbitrary, it is important that you protect your license to the best of your ability.

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IL license lawyerSocial media has dramatically changed the way people interact with one another, and it has become a large part of life for many people. In fact, a recent study found that about 244 million Americans—about two-thirds of the entire population!—use some type of social media. Many professionals, including lawyers, accountants, and consultants, maintain various social media accounts, as do many doctors, psychologists, dentists, and other healthcare professionals. In light of modern privacy laws, however, medical professionals must be sure that their social media posting remains ethical and compliant with the standards that apply to such individuals.

Privacy and Ethics

A healthcare professional is required to follow a variety of privacy laws, the most notable of which is the Health Insurance Portability Act—more commonly known as HIPAA. While there are many elements to HIPAA, one of the law’s primary functions is to ensure that patient’s personal and healthcare information is well protected. Unfortunately, not all medical professionals are as careful on social media as they should be, and sometimes, a doctor or nurse might post something that violates HIPAA, leading to the possibility of action from the state licensing board.

Keeping Yourself Safe

If you are a healthcare professional who uses social media for personal or professional reasons, there are few things you can do protect yourself from potential problems:

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IL license lawyerBy their very nature, most physicians—including Medical Doctors (M.D.s) and Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.s)—tend to have an independent decision-making spirit. While they are also generally very intelligent and dedicated to their patients, the responsibilities that come with gaining admitting and practicing privileges at a particular hospital can sometimes seem to conflict with a doctor’s sense of independence.

In addition to standards of care, hospital privileges also involve collegial, social, and legal elements that are more complicated than just taking care of patients. A physician who does not live up to all of a hospital’s expectations could quickly find that he or she is in danger of losing membership on the hospital’s medical staff.

Avoid These Types of Behaviors

It is understandable that concerns over the level of care that a physician provides could lead to the possible suspension or termination of the doctor’s hospital privileges. Such concerns could pertain to the doctor’s bedside manner, the failure to seek approval before trying unorthodox treatments, or not reaching out to specialists or consultants for questions outside of the physician’s area of specialty. Repeated incidents could become problematic and lead to the hospital suspending your privileges.

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IL medical license defense lawyerAccording to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), there are currently more than 60 million Americans who are enrolled as Medicare beneficiaries. This number includes individuals enrolled in “original” Medicare as well as in Medicare Advantage plans with private insurers. In order to be able to serve this large portion of the population, a medical provider must enroll as a Medicare provider and keep that enrollment in good standing. This means the provider must meet all of the requirements set forth by CMS and avoid behaviors that could lead to a revocation of the provider’s Medicare status.

Revocation of Medicare Enrollment

Under §424.535 of the Code of Federal Regulations, there are many different reasons for which a provider could have his or her Medicare enrollment status revoked. They include noncompliance with enrollment requirements, causing harm to patients, being convicted of certain felonies, improper medication prescribing practices, and failing to comply with CMS reporting requirements, among many others.

As a provider, you could also lose your Medicare enrollment status for abusing your billing privileges. Under the law, abuse of billing privileges includes but is not limited to:

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IL license defense lawyerHave you recently learned that your medical practice or pharmacy is being audited or investigated by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA)? You might have discovered this information by chance or have been informed directly by a DEA agent. Either way, a DEA investigation can be frightening, especially if your livelihood depends on keeping your DEA registration and your professional license. The good news is that our firm is equipped to help healthcare professionals of all types in all types of DEA-related matters.

DEA Tasked With Helping to Manage the Opioid Crisis

Over the last few years, the misuse and abuse of opioid drugs have become major problems throughout the country. In fact, the situation is serious enough that the acting U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services declared a public health emergency in 2017, and health officials began using the word “epidemic” to describe the widespread nature of the crisis. At the time, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that 91 per day were dying from opioid overdoses.

As part of the effort to address the crisis, President Trump has utilized federal law enforcement agencies, including the DEA, to play an important role. When it comes to medical practices and pharmacies, the DEA is primarily responsible for ensuring that doctors and pharmacists are prescribing and dispensing controlled substances in accordance with the law and proper clinical guidelines. In most cases, this means investigators are looking for possibly excessive combinations of drugs listed on Schedules II and III by the Controlled Substances Act. If the DEA launches a full-scale investigation, it generally means that there is suspicion of systematic and severe violations.

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IL license defense lawyerBecause of their important role in providing for the care and health of their patients, Illinois nursing homes are subject to oversight from both the Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) and the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to ensure they are in compliance with regulations. With the additional risks that the COVID-19 pandemic poses for nursing home residents, additional guidelines have been put in place to promote their safety. Now more than ever, it is important for nursing homes to take the necessary measures to avoid violations that could impact their licensure.

Guidelines for Illinois Nursing Homes During COVID-19

Based on guidance from the Centers for Disease Control, CMS has issued guidelines for the safe operation of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities throughout the United States. For example, nursing homes must:

  • Require staff to wear personal protective equipment (PPE), including masks, gloves, gowns, and visors
  • Regularly screen residents, staff, and visitors for symptoms of COVID-19
  • Use proper hand hygiene
  • Follow a plan for testing and monitoring residents and staff for COVID-19
  • Restrict visitation, communal dining, and group activities

CMS has also instituted a system for removing some restrictions in phases for nursing homes that are able to control the spread of COVID-19.

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IL license lawyerPsychologists provide an important service for their patients, who rely on their expertise for therapy and treatment of a wide range of mental and behavioral health issues. Psychologists who breach their patients’ trust may face serious consequences, including the loss of their license. In some cases, they may even face medical malpractice lawsuits.

What Is Medical Malpractice?

Medical malpractice occurs when a healthcare professional breaches his or her duty of care to a patient, resulting in the patient’s injury or harm. For physical healthcare providers, some of the most common forms of malpractice are surgical errors, improper medication or prescriptions, misdiagnosis, and misinterpretation of test results or patient history.

While psychologists may not have a medical degree, they do provide a form of healthcare, and prescribing psychologists are licensed to prescribe medical treatment. Therefore, they may face medical malpractice claims related to improper prescriptions, misdiagnoses, or failure to diagnose a mental health condition. According to the American Psychological Association (APA), some psychologists also face claims of malpractice due to emotional abuse or sexual misconduct with their clients.

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IL defense lawyerThe global pandemic COVID-19 has hit the U.S. especially hard, with over 199,000 confirmed cases in Illinois alone. From the beginning, this virus has led to overfilled hospital beds and overworked medical professionals. With no vaccination in sight and a high demand for doctors, nurses, and other medical professionals, the U.S. has been forced to reevaluate their licensing procedures and state-by-state restrictions. It is common for states to adopt emergency licensing processes in response to natural disasters and their aftermath. Many states have followed this trend by enacting emergency-response licensure laws to allow volunteers from other states to practice their profession without being required to seek out licensure in that specific state.

Uniform Emergency Volunteer Health Practitioner Act

The Uniform Emergency Volunteer Health Practitioner Act (UEVHPA) is legislation that was initially developed in 2006 and is being modeled by many states during the COVID-19 pandemic. This legislation allows any participating state, Illinois included, to recognize out-of-state medical licenses during a declared state emergency. All practitioners who wish to participate in this reciprocal-licensing program must register to do so.

Illinois-Specific Legislation

Aside from the UEVHPA, which has been adopted by most states during this time, Illinois has enacted a few regulations of its own. Under Gov. Pritzker’s direction, the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation is allowing healthcare workers whose licenses have recently expired to temporarily restore their licenses to assist with COVID-19 patients. Physician assistants and doctors who have expired or inactive licenses from less than three years ago are able to return to work without paying any required licensing fees or making further progress on their education requirements. Additional leeway has been given to nurses and respiratory therapists, giving them a five-year pass rather than the three-year allotment given to doctors and physician assistants.

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IL license defense lawyerIt is fairly recognized that nursing school is not an easy path to take. While slightly less rigorous than medical school, those who wish to be Illinois nurses are still required to take intense courses aimed at preparing them for in-field work and the difficult exam, known as the NCLEX-RN, to become a registered nurse. This exam is a national, standardized test to ensure that future nurses are fully capable of taking care of patients and performing other medical duties.

Since many nursing students take their NCLEX exam coming out of college, they will typically receive nursing licensure in the state where they went to school. However, it is unlikely that these medical professionals will never move out of state. For those moving to Illinois, there is a particular process that they must follow to become an Illinois certified nurse.

Out-of-State Licensure

If a nurse moves from one state to another and still intends on working in this field, they will need to receive “licensure by endorsement” in the new state that they are moving to. In other words, out of state nurses must receive license verification and endorsement from the previous state(s) that they worked in. This includes the current state, the original state (if different), and any other state that the nurse has practiced over the past five years. Illinois requires nurses to provide their NCLEX results, either from the state of original licensure or the testing company. These endorsement candidates can be issued a temporary license to begin work while the paperwork is being processed.

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IL license defense lawyerThere are many types of professions that are regulated in Illinois, such as cosmetology, psychology, financial services, and even architecture. One regulated profession that does not come as much of a surprise is dentistry. The Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation (IDFPR) oversees the licensing, continuing education, practice, and discipline of dentists and related professions in the state. Becoming a dentist takes years of hard work and study, but getting your dental license requires you to know all of the requirements before you apply for your Illinois dental license.

General Dentistry Licenses

Like many other health-related professions in Illinois and throughout the country, you must have a license to practice dentistry in Illinois. To obtain a license to practice general dentistry, you must:

  • Be at least 21 years old
  • Be of “good moral character”
  • Provide evidence that you graduated from a dentistry school accredited by the American Dental Association
  • Present evidence that you passed both parts of the National Board Dental Examination
  • Pass an examination conducted by one of the five regional testing services: the Central Regional Dental Testing Service, Inc. (CRDTS); the Southern Regional Testing Agency, Inc. (SRTA); the Western Regional Examining Board (WREB); the North East Regional Board (NERB) or the Council of Interstate Testing Agencies (CITA)

Anesthesia Permits

In many cases, a dentist or dental specialist such as an orthodontist or oral surgeon will want to be able to administer anesthesia in their office. Legally, they cannot do that without first applying for and receiving the proper anesthesia permits. Illinois ranks its dental anesthesia permits at varying levels. A dentist with a general practicing license can use minimal sedation, where consciousness is only slightly affected. However, any further forms of sedation, such as moderate sedation, deep sedation, and general anesthesia require further education, experience, training, and other requirements.

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IL license lawyerAt some point, we have all felt exhausted, cynical, or unhappy with our jobs. This is called burnout and it can have negative effects on job performance and personal happiness. Physician burnout has been one of the topics of concern among the medical community for a few years now. According to the American Medical Association (AMA), more than 40 percent of all physicians in the United States report experiencing signs of burnout. Physician burnout has been linked to higher rates of medical errors, lower quality of patient care, and a higher rate of physician drug and alcohol abuse and/or addiction. Physician burnout and its associated outcomes could have serious implications for your Illinois medical license.

Signs of Burnout

Burnout is a long-term response to work-related stress that is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and diminished feelings of personal accomplishment. Burnout is not unique to medical professions, but physicians tend to be more prone than others. Other symptoms of burnout can include:

  • Fatigue
  • Loss of empathy
  • Cynical or negative attitudes toward patients
  • Decreased productivity
  • Detachment
  • Depression
  • Suicidal thoughts

Effects of Burnout

Physician burnout has been considered by many to be an epidemic that is consistent with providers across the country. Not only does burnout severely impact the provider’s own physical and mental health, but it can also impact their job performance, future job prospects, and patient care and health. According to a study published by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, physicians who reported symptoms of burnout were more than twice as likely to make a medical error than physicians who did not report symptoms of burnout.

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IL license defense lawyerIn the healthcare industry, there are many safeguards put in place to protect patients. When it comes to medication and pharmacies, it is no different. PBM pharmacy audits are conducted both for the sake of the pharmacy benefit manager (PMB) and for you, the pharmacy owner. A PBM audit can be a stressful experience for a pharmacy, especially a small, independent one, but many pharmacies cannot operate at desired capacity without also working with a PBM. If you have an upcoming PBM pharmacy audit, proper preparation is key to success.

Documentation is Extremely Important

For many pharmacies, but especially independent pharmacies, documentation is often an area that needs attention. When your PBM auditor comes to your pharmacy, they may request to see certain documentation that could be from months or even years ago. This documentation could be anything to do with things such as supply changes, such as going from a 30-day supply to a 60-day supply, or early refills. Having your documentation completed, thorough, and organized will save you much stress during the audit.

Consistency Is Expected

Part of the job of a PBM auditor is to make sure that each patient receives the same standard of care when they use your pharmacy. This is accomplished by making sure that all employees are following the same rules and policies while they perform their job. When your PBM auditor is at your pharmacy, they will be looking for any errors made by your staff, such as checking the amount of medication dispensed or ensuring all of the proper forms and documentation are filled out. It is a good idea to have an official standard operating procedure (SOP) written out and distributed to all of your employees so that they understand what is expected of them every time they fill a prescription.

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IL license attorneyIn many ways, nurses are integral to a properly-functioning healthcare system. Nurses play an important role in patient care, especially because they are usually the ones who spend a majority of time with the patient. One of the tasks that nurses perform is documenting a patient’s history and medical care, also known as charting. Charting is an essential part of a nurse’s job and mistakes on a chart or an incomplete chart could result in injury or harm to the patient or in some cases, even death. Because of this, your nursing license could be at risk if you make a charting error. If you face disciplinary action related to a charting or documentation error, you should speak with an Illinois nursing license defense lawyer.

Common Documentation Errors

Proper charting and patient documentation are crucial for not only the patient’s health and safety, but also for your sake. Charting errors can lead to a slew of issues such as improper treatments, lack of treatment, permanent damage or even death to a patient. If a malpractice or other legal suit is filed pertaining to your patient and it was discovered that you made an error when you were charting, you could face serious consequences.

Charting and documentation errors can come in many different forms. Even though nurses are not the only ones responsible for a patient’s care, they are typically the ones who have the most contact with the patient and therefore usually have much responsibility for the patient’s wellbeing. One simple charting error could be the end of a nursing career. The most common charting errors include:

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IL license defense lawyerBeing accused of committing medical malpractice is one of the worst things that could happen to a medical professional. It takes years upon years of education, training, residency, and internship to become a physician. The last thing you would want to see is all of that go down the drain because of a patient complaint. In most cases, medical professionals do not have to worry about facing disciplinary action if they are accused of malpractice, but there are situations in which your license could be put into jeopardy if you are found to be responsible for malpractice.

What Is Medical Malpractice?

Medical malpractice occurs when a medical professional causes injury or harm to a patient because of a negligent act. Malpractice can occur during any stage of care, but to be considered malpractice, it must contain the following three elements:

  • The standard of care was violated
  • An injury was caused by the negligent act
  • That injury resulted in significant damages

There must always be these three elements present for a case to be legally considered medical malpractice. Accusing a doctor of malpractice is serious and could harm the doctor’s career and reputation. Because of this, cases that are missing even one of the elements would likely not hold up in court.

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Il pharmacist defense attorneyTo become a pharmacist, a person has to go through many years of schooling, pass dozens of tests and complete thousands of hours of an internship. Becoming a pharmacist is a huge accomplishment; to have that all taken away from you can be devastating. There are many reasons why your pharmacist license might have been taken away. Perhaps you got into trouble for illegally distributing controlled substances. Or maybe you made an error in a prescription that you filled for a patient. Whatever the reason, having your ability to practice taken away can be disheartening. However, there are steps you can take to have your license reinstated.

Reinstating Your Pharmacist License

In most cases, it is possible to have your pharmacist license reinstated if it has lapsed into the inactive status. The process of reinstatement will look different depending on the length of time that has passed since the license was inactive status. Depending on the time that has passed, your requirements for reinstatement will be slightly different.

If Your License Has Been Inactive for Less Than Five Years

According to the Pharmacy Practice Act, a pharmacist whose license has been inactive for less than five years can restore their license if they do one of the following:

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IL license defense lawyerIn the state of Illinois, there are hundreds, if not thousands, of people who have careers as licensed professionals. These professions can range from the obvious, such as doctors and nurses, to the not-so-obvious, like architects and engineers. The one thing that all of these careers have in common is the need to become licensed in the state they practice. The state of Illinois has also put into place certain requirements for license renewal for many professions, one such requirement is continuing education. This requirement exists for the sake of maintaining a knowledgeable and up-to-date workforce. One such profession that requires continuing education is social work.

Understanding Social Work Licensure

In Illinois, there are two types of licenses you can receive in the social work profession: a licensed social worker (LSW) and a licensed clinical social worker (LCSW). These two types of licenses are very similar, though they have separate qualifications and requirements, mostly depending on your experience as a social worker. No matter the type of license, social work licenses expire on November 30 of every odd-numbered year. Despite these differences, the continuing education requirements are the same for these licenses.

Maintaining Continuing Education Requirements for Social Workers

The first time a social worker goes to renew their license, they do not have to have completed any continuing education requirements, though they must still submit an application for renewal. The second time a social worker renews their license, they must certify that they have completed 30 hours of continuing education. These 30 hours of education must be related to the practice of social work but they must also consist of:

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IL medical license attorneyThe United States has been experiencing what has been referred to as an opioid epidemic for years now. Part of the cause of the epidemic was due to pharmaceutical companies insisting these medications were safe and non-addictive. This led physicians to prescribe narcotics at an increasing rate for patients with chronic pain. After it was discovered that these medications were actually highly addictive, they became controlled substances and subject to many regulations. State licensing and regulatory agencies began cracking down on physicians’ prescribing of these medications, punishing many who were abusive or neglectful in their power to prescribe. In 2019, 36 physicians in Illinois received some sort of disciplinary action due to improper controlled substance prescribing practices.

Opioid Use Guidelines for Physicians

In 2017, the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB) adopted a policy that outlines responsible prescribing practices for physicians with the privilege to prescribe controlled substances. This policy gives state medical boards criteria to use to evaluate a physician’s management of a chronic pain patient. This criteria includes evaluating the physician’s:

  • Patients’ assessments and evaluations
  • Monitoring of the patient while on the controlled substances
  • Use of treatment plans and patient pain goals
  • Use of treatment agreements with long-term opioid patients
  • Decision to use opioids as a treatment
  • Decision to terminate opioid treatment for a patient
  • Use of periodic and unannounced drug testing in patients
  • Upkeep and accuracy of the opioid patient’s medical records

In addition to providing physicians with guidelines as to how to responsibly prescribe controlled substances, the state of Illinois also requires any physician with a controlled substance license to register with the Illinois Prescription Monitoring Program (ILPMP). This program is an online resource that physicians are meant to use to prevent “doctor shopping,” which occurs when a patient visits multiple doctors to seek multiple prescriptions for controlled substances. Before a physician prescribes a controlled pain medication to a patient, they must first use the ILPMP to search for any other active prescriptions the patient might have.

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IL license defenseOne of the biggest and most concerning things that could happen to a physician is losing their privilege to practice medicine. While this type of disciplinary action is not as common as other types, it does happen in some cases and can be devastating to the physician. According to the latest information from the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB), there were more than 8,800 state medical board actions taken across the country in 2017. These actions range from something as simple as imposing a fine to permanently revoking a physician’s medical license. Here are the most common forms of disciplinary action taken against physicians in the United States:

  • License restricted (1,343): The most common form of discipline from medical boards across the country was to restrict a professional’s medical license. Having your medical license restricted typically means you are limited in what you can do as a physician. Typically, restrictions have something to do with clinical privileges, such as restricting the ability to write prescriptions.
  • Reprimand (1,147): Not far behind restrictions were reprimands. If a physician is reprimanded, this means the medical board issued a warning or letter of concern to a physician. Reprimands can be private or public and can sometimes be issued instead of formal charges or complaints.
  • Administrative action (1,023): If a physician has had an administrative action issued against them, it typically does not affect their medical licensure. Administrative actions can be issued by medical boards for various reasons, including failure to pay licensing fees.
  • Fine (890): Another common outcome of misconduct is a fine. A physician can be issued a monetary fine for many reasons including improper record keeping or similar issues.
  • Conditions Imposed (887): If a physician has conditions imposed on him or her, they must meet certain requirements or fulfill certain conditions to avoid further discipline by the board.

Have You Been Subject to Disciplinary Action? Contact an Illinois Medical License Defense Attorney

Any type of disciplinary action taken against you is serious. Before you have any action taken against you, you will be notified by the Illinois Department of Financial and Professional Regulation. If this happens, you should immediately contact a knowledgeable Illinois medical license defense lawyer. At the Law Offices of Joseph J. Bogdan, LLC, we understand how a disciplinary action can affect your career. To schedule a consultation, call our office today at 630-310-1267.

 

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